White Dyckia - 10 seeds

White Dyckia - 10 seeds

5.99

Dyckia marnier-lapostollei is a very slow growing plant with mostly solitary stemless rosettes up to 10 inches (25 cm) wide with up to 10, but usually fewer, triangular-shaped, up to 8 inches (20 cm) long, gray-green leaves that are covered in silvery white scale-like hairs, so that the plant looks almost completely white. These leaves twist and curl as they recurve downward and have large claw-like recurved spines along the margins. Mature plants can send up a spike up to 3 feet (90 cm) tall in summer with orange-yellow tubular flowers scattered near the tip.

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Most of the plants survive in warm regions with heavy rainfall for half the year and very dry conditions the rest of the time. This makes Dyckia care slightly challenging, as getting the right balance of moisture to keep the plant happy may be difficult. Dyckia growing conditions in their natural setting should be mimicked as much as possible. In their native region, it is not uncommon to find some forms growing on top of rocks near water. Water and the cycle of the monsoon season are important features to Dyckia health. They are used to rather poor soil when they do grow in ground and should be planted in a good succulent mixture. Dyckia need full sun and temperatures of up to 90°F (32°C) to thrive. Beware of exposing the plants to freezing temperatures for more than a brief time as they are not cold hardy. Temperatures below 40°F (4°C) seem to be the limit of Dyckia growing conditions. Dyckia are exposed to harsh sun and very dry conditions for most of the year. Then the rainy season appears and the plants are half drowned. Contrary to common sense, they seem to love this treatment and plants are healthiest when the monsoon season is harsh and long. General Care While actively growing, the plants need regular water to produce happy plants. The soil should not be soggy but evenly moist at all times. Use a saucer under potted plants to keep the roots from sitting in water but allow for evaporation and consistent humidity. In winter, when growth is dormant, you may reduce the amount of water by half. Fertilize from spring to fall with a half strength liquid plant food. In the wild, the plants form pups or offsets, which result in new plants. The same is true in container grown plants and these can be divided away from the parent with ease.