Love in a mist blue - 50 seeds - Nigella damascena

Love in a mist blue - 50 seeds - Nigella damascena

1.39

Love-in-a-mist is a small to medium-sized plant that grows 15 to 24 inches high and up to one foot wide (if not crowded). Plants have finely cut, bright green leaves that resemble dill leaves. Light-green, lacy, finely divided threadlike bracts form the “mist” surrounding the plant’s jewel-like flowers. Love-in-a-mist flowers are typically bright blue to very pale blue, but sometimes may be white, pink, or lavender. Each flower is 1½ inches across, with five large, petal-like sepals and small, deeply-divided petals hidden beneath the flower’s stamens. The flowers are followed by attractive, balloon-shaped “seedpods” (actually an inflated capsule composed of five fused true seedpods). These “seedpods” are up to two inches long, and green with purple or bronze stripes. 

Quantity:
Add To Cart

Love-in-a-mist does best in full sun and well-drained, fertile soil.  Sow the deep-black, sharp-cornered seeds about ⅛ inch deep wherever you want the plants to grow.  Seeds should germinate within two to three weeks under most conditions.  Begin sowing seeds as soon as the soil can be worked in early spring.  Thin emerging seedlings so that there are eight to 10 inches between plants.  Seeds also can be started indoors four to six weeks before they are to be transplanted outdoors, but they should be sown in individual peat pots and transplanted with extreme care.  Love-in-a-mist does not transplant well because of its long taproot.  Once established, love-in-a-mist readily self-sows.  Thin the seedlings while small to prevent overcrowding or encroachment on neighboring plants.  Deadhead regularly or remove seedpods early to reduce the density of volunteer seedlings. 
Love-in-a-mist should begin to bloom about three months after seed germination and has a short bloom period (only a month or two).  Make successive plantings every three weeks for continuous bloom all summer.  Seeding in the summer or fall often will produce seedlings that will overwinter and bloom the following spring.  Deadheading will prolong flowering, but will eliminate the plants’ decorative seedpods.